When in Doubt...

... remember the wisdom of Socrates:

 I know that I know nothing. 

Do NOT Promise that You will Call Back!

The Fastest Way to Subliminally Tick Off Your Clients

I'm going to share a professional pet peeve of mine.  How many times have you called a friend or professional associate and you get sent to voicemail?  No big deal, right?  Have you noticed how much less often you actually leave a message?  Instead, you might decide to call back in a few minutes or send a text.  Sometimes, you may decide that the notification on the person's phone of your missed call will be enough.  Regardless, you rarely choose to leave a message.

Why is that?

I think the top reason most of us don't leave a message is either: a) we know the recipient won't even listen to the voicemail and will just call us back or b) they won't even bother with the message, nor will they call back.  It's like we sense this is going to happen and decide: 'What's the point?'

Again, why is that?

I think it has to do with the promise nearly every person makes when they record a voicemail outgoing message?  What is the one thing everyone says?  Check it out:

Hello, you've reached Tom Jones.  I'm not available to take your call right now, but if you leave your name and number, I'll return your call as soon as I am able.

Did you spot the promise?  They ask you to leave your name and number and then they say they will call you back as soon as they are able.  Generally speaking, how often is that?  Are they going to call the annoying telemarketer who has an amazing trip for them to take if they just listen to a 3-hour sales presentation?  Are they going to call the sibling they are having a quarrel with and it appears there is no resolution in sight?  Are they going to call the credit collection specialist who reminded them their payment is overdue?  

Likely, no.  So what makes you think you're any different?  Just like you, I have made thousands of business calls over my career and nearly every single outgoing voicemail message says: 'Please leave your name and number and I'll return your call as soon as I am able' or some other variation of that.  However, less than 5% of these recipients ever return the call.  

It's a Trust Breaker

The late, great Dr. Steven R. Covey used to compare the winning of people's trust to making deposits in a bank.  When we make commitments and promises to others and then we follow through on fulfilling what we're promising, we are making a deposit in that person's emotional bank account.  When we break commitments and promises, we are making withdrawals.  Is it ever possible to make withdrawals and still be in a good place in the relationship?  Of course!  But those are usually after many deposits have accumulated over time.  It's also worth noting that just like Rapid Rewards points with Southwest Airlines, what you put into it will always outweigh what you take out.  In other words, it might take five deposits or even 10 to equal the one withdrawal you make when you break a commitment.

So, the basic rule of thumb here is that if you are screening your calls (even with prospective and existing clients) or you just never get around to calling people back, don't promise you will in the outgoing message.  It'll just piss them off.  Instead, try something like this:

Hello, you've reached Jane Thompson.  I'm not available to take your call at this time.  Please leave a message.  

See!  You made a request, but you didn't promise to return the call.  That might come across as being a jerk, but honestly it is better to not make promises you know you won't keep than to try to make promises that you anticipate you likely won't keep.  

You know what will impress them most of all when you do this?  IF YOU CALL THEM BACK!  It's that simple.  Try it.

For more information on how to make and keep your commitments, check out my new book:

https://www.amazon.com/Better-Business-Development-Now-Clients-ebook/dp/B07219PS7K/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1505375726&sr=1-1&keywords=better+business+development+now

The Expert vs. The Specialist

When I hear the word 'expert,' I always imagine someone who has gathered a bunch of information about a particular subject.  I picture him or her sitting on their pile of books, dispensing unsolicited advice to any traveler or passerby who is within earshot.

I compare that word to that of the 'specialist.'  A specialist is someone who has trained and learned the things he or she wants to become proficient in so that other people will benefit from that time and effort spent honing skills and knowledge.  

The expert can tell you how the fire started, but its the specialist that knows how to run into the burning building to save others, because that's what specialists do.  The expert can tell you all of the ways to stop the fire, but its the specialist who will actually act on those ways to put it out.

Relying on your vast body of knowledge causes you to run the risk of becoming obsolete.  Seeking out new ideas and continually honing your skills to serve others is one sure way to always stay relevant. 

Eyes open.  Mind even more open.  Skills sharp.  It's that simple.

 

Before he was in the UFC, Conor McGregor was an excellent typist.

Before he was in the UFC, Conor McGregor was an excellent typist.